I mentioned previously my talk on “Digital Natives Run by Digital Immigrants: IT Services Are Dead – Long Live IT Services 2.0!” which I’ve been invited to present at the UCISA 2008 Management Conference. In my post I described the background to this talk and invited feedback on the slides which, together with an audio track, is available on Slideshare.

I was particularly struck by the comments made by Martin Weller:

Hi Brian – I have finally shed all institutional services – it’s marvellously liberating. And this is just the basic stuff – I have also evolved a PLE/PWE (for want of a better term). IT services simply can’t compete – just look at the email – my mailbox was full at the OU. With GMail I am using 1%. That’s an order of magnitude difference. And the same applies with every tool you care to mention in lots of different ways – design, usability, robustness (the idea that IT services hosted tools are less robust doesn’t stand up). 

Martin provide further information on how he sold his soul to Google on his own blog. The suggestion that I’ve made previously that IT Services need to transform themselves to take into account the Web 2.0 environment is clearly demonstrated by Martin’s actions.

As I have another meeting which clashes with the UCISA conference I won’t be able to give my talk in person. However a video presentation of the talk is available in various formats, including this one which is hosted on the Zentation service.

IT Services Are Dead – Long Live IT Services 2.0!
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Talk on IT Services Are Dead – Long Live IT Services 2.0!

Andy Powell will be co-presenting at the UCISA Conference – and Andy will be physically present 🙂  Andy has already posted some of his thoughts on what he’ll be saying. In his post, entitled P vs. P in a user-centric world, Andy focusses on the “move towards user-centricity … and in particular the use of the word ‘personal’ in both Personal Learning Environment (PLE) and Personal Research Environment (PRE)“.

Martin Weller provides a good example on how individuals are beginning to select their own preferred set of IT tools, and no longer feel constrained by the tools provided by the institution.  But is this the start of an inevitable trend or will it be limited to small numbers who are highly skilled in use of IT?  What about the pitfalls? And how should IT Services respond?

Time permitting, Andy Powell with address comments made on this blog and on his eFoundations blog at the UCISA conference. Here’s an opportunity to make your voice heard.